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CriticaLink Helps Countries Lacking EMS

Jennifer Farrell, a Fulbright scholar and fourth-year medical student at Tulane University, founded CriticaLink, a nonprofit mobile app company, to more quickly help first responders get to accidents in countries where emergency medical services are inconsistent or, in some cases, nonexistent.   Calls made through the app will be dispatched through a call center, or app users can send photos and submit geo-tagged information. When accidents are reported, nearby trained first responders will receive a ping and a pop-up notification on their phones. The number for the call center is a long one for now (096 7878 7878), but post-pilot phase, the company will transition to a shorter number, like 911, once they’ve collected enough data and make any necessary changes to the system, Ms. Farrell said.     The app launched in the Google Play store this past November, along with the call center. “We are working on the Apple and Windows version, but since 87 percent of our volunteers run Android phones in Bangladesh — they’re cheaper and easier to come by — [there] hasn’t been a big push,” she said. Tags: CriticaLink, Google Play, EMS, emergency medicine, Android, BangladeshPublished: 1/27/2015 8:38:00 AM Original Article… …

The Health e-MedRecord

Emergency Medicine News spoke with Carlo Reyes, MD, JD, the vice chief of staff and the assistant medical director of emergency medicine at Los Robles Hospital in Thousand Oaks, CA, and the founder and CEO of Health e-MedRecord, a patient-centered and emergency physician-designed EMR solution. He discussed the difference between his EMR and every other product available, the emphasis on patient involvement, and how his product is HIPAA-secure. Below is an abbreviated transcript of the interview. Read Dr. Reyes’ past columns at http://bit.ly/ReyesAtYourDefense.     Why is the Health e-MedRecord different from every other EMR? Probably the most important difference of HEMR is that this is a company that was founded by doctors and for the purposes specifically of realizing the potential of what an electronic medical record was intended to do, which was to make doctors and providers and nurses more efficient in delivering high-quality patient care. You know, I’ve been practicing emergency medicine and pediatrics for 12 years now, and as electronic medical records unfolded in the context of meaningful use and all these requirements, it’s actually made us less efficient. It makes no sense to me.           It’s really a company that focuses on the needs of…

CrowdOptic Hopes to Improve EP, EMT Communication

CrowdOptic allows emergency physicians to observe patients inside an ambulance en route to a hospital by sharing the perspective of an EMT broadcasting in real-time through a wearable device like Google Glass. CrowdOptic is one of five official Google Glass partners.   “Through 4G on the ambulance, he’ll upload high-definition 1080p video that streams to the Cloud and can be accessed through a secure link by a computer or a tablet or even an iPhone by personnel in the receiving hospital,” said Jim Kovach, MD, JD, CrowdOptic’s vice president of business development.   “An emergency physician can talk through two-way audio to the EMT, and he can [zero] in through a digital zoom to instruct the EMT to look at an EKG or to even conduct a pupil exam to look for a contraction or dilation.”   The company said they hope the technology will lead to a new relationship between EPs and EMTs based on a dialogue that’s going to occur over time, Dr. Kovach said. Currently, the company is primarily working on pilots for health care systems that have large stroke coverage, with letting stroke patients bypass an ED the brass ring of this new technology.   “To be…